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Archive for September 2019

Your Circuit Breaker is Constantly Tripping

An electrical circuit breaker is a switching device that can be operated automatically or manually for controlling and protecting the electrical power system, and the electrical devices connected to it. The circuit breaker trips when too much electricity flows through it or when it cannot handle the excess current load. This means that the flow of electricity is cut off to keep your circuits from overheating or causing more damage.


If there were no circuit breaker trips, then house fires would have been quite a common issue. When a circuit breaker trips, then you have to go outside or down the basement, wherever the circuit breaker is located, and get the power back on again. It is important that spacial attention is given when the circuit breaker is designed so that safe interruption of arc is produced during the operation of circuit breaker. Even though the tripping of circuit breakers ensures safety, it can get quite frustrating to constantly experience them and getting the power back on repeatedly. If you know the reason behind the constant tripping, you can do something about it. Let us look at the three main reasons that cause circuit breakers to trip.
Three Reasons Why Circuit Breaker Keep Tripping


1. Circuit Overloads. A circuit overload is one of the main reasons why circuit breakers trip constantly. This occurs when you want a particular circuit to provide more electricity than its actual capacity. This will lead to the overheating of the circuit which puts all the electrical appliances connected to the circuit at risk. For example, if your television is connected to the circuit which actually needs 15 amps but is now using 20 amps, then the circuit of the television system will get fried and damaged. The circuit breaker trips to prevent this from happening, potentially even preventing a major fire.You can address this issue by trying to redistribute your electrical devices and keeping them off of the same circuits. You can even turn off some devices to reduce the electrical load on the circuit breaker.


2. Short Circuits. Another common reason why circuit breakers trip is a short circuit, which is more dangerous than an overloaded circuit. A short circuit is caused when a “hot” wire comes into contact with a “neutral wire” in one of your electrical outlets. Whenever this happens, a large amount of current will flow through the circuit, creating more heat than what the circuit can handle. When this happens the breaker will trip, shutting off the circuit to prevent dangerous events such as a fire.Short circuits could occur for a number of reasons such as faulty wiring or a loose connection You can identify a short circuit by a burning smell that is usually left around the breaker. Additionally, you may also notice a brown or black discoloration around it.


3. Ground Fault Surges. Ground fault surges are similar to short circuits. They occur when a hot wire touches a ground wire that is made of bare copper or the side of a metal outlet box which is connected to the ground wire. This will cause more electricity to pass through it which the circuit cannot handle. The breaker trips in order to protect the circuit and appliances from overheating or from potential fires. If ground fault surges occur, you can identify them through a discoloration around your outlet.If you avoid or overlook any of these problems, you are putting the safety of your home and loved ones at great risk. If you experience tripping of the circuit breakers quite frequently, it is time to call in the professionals to investigate the problem. Do not try to handle this issue on your own.

How to replace a light switch UK

First of all Isolate the Supply

Light switches are functional items, and many of the basic varieties (made from white plastic) can look a bit plain. However, replacing these with decorative switches can add a stylish finishing touch to your home. Or you could change an existing switch to give you convenient, multi-way control of a light in your hallway, landing or stairwell.
Never take risks with electrical safety. Before you start any type of electrical work, you must follow these following safety precautions:
Remember to switch off the mains power at the consumer unit/fuse box. Isolate the circuit you plan to work on by removing the circuit fuse. Put this in your pocket to avoid accidental replacementOr switch off the breaker and lock it if you canAttach a note to the unit to advise you are working on the circuit.Check the circuit is dead with a socket tester or voltage tester/meter for lighting circuits. These confirm whether circuits are dead and safe to work onCheck all finished work with a socket tester (or voltage tester for lighting circuits) before usingFor your safety, these products must be installed in accordance with local Building Regulations. If in any doubt, or where required by the law, consult a competent person who is registered with an electrical certification scheme. Further information is available online or from your local authority.
Be cautious when opening up multi-way switches. The lights they control should take power from the same circuit, but if yours are incorrectly wired and take power from different circuits, there will be live cables at each switch position when one circuit is isolated. There is more than one method of wiring multi-way lights. If yours does not match the system shown here, that doesn’t necessarily mean they are unsafe